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From pyramids to ‘spinning tops,’ here’s what nutrition guidelines look like in 7 countries around the world

From pyramids to ‘spinning tops,’ here’s what nutrition guidelines look like in 7 countries around the world Posted on October 14, 2019Leave a comment

Welcome to Passport Nutrition. We’re mapping the flavors of the world one country at a time by speaking with people who wrap their careers around cuisine as well as those who simply savor an hour spent in the kitchen after work. You’ll find that a “healthy plate” isn’t one size—or country—fits all.

Ask your social circle for a definition of healthy eating and chances are you’ll be met with responses that run the gamut. Meat or no meat, cow’s milk or oat milk, carbs or no carbs… The debate over what it actually looks like to eat healthy reaches the same heights of whether Ross and Rachel were really on a break. People get heated.

https://zenco.com.vn Imagine taking that conversation global. What does eating healthy look like to people in Japan, India, or Argentina? Well, you’re about to find out. Detailed here is how seven different parts of the world—including the United States—define healthy eating, according to the nutritional guidelines from their governments. What do we all have in common? Where do we differ? You’re about to get schooled.

Graphic: Well+Good CreativeUnited States of America

The nutritional guidelines in the United States are determined by the department of Health & Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and are reevaluated every five years to take into consideration any new, emerging scientific data. You know that food pyramid we were all taught in elementary school? It’s totally outdated—and has been since 2011 when the government introduced a new model they call My Plate.

Set up like a plate, the latest nutritional guidelines emphasize the importance of vegetables, grains, fruits, and protein, and dairy. Below is the breakdown of what they specifically recommend for adult women, per day:2 1/2 cups of vegetables6 ounces of grains1 1/2 to 2 cups of fruit5 to 5 1/2 ounces of protein3 cups of dairy

“The core recommendations for these healthy eating patterns are unchanged from previous editions of the Guidelines, and continue to encourage Americans to consume more healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, lean meats, seafood, other protein foods, and oils,” the HHS’s site reads. “They also recommend limiting sodium, saturated and trans fats, and added sugars.”

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