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5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT ENGINE OIL

5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT ENGINE OIL Posted on February 19, 2020Leave a comment

Monograde or multi-grade, conventional or synthetic, for diesel or gasoline engines … Placing in front of the oil shelf and choosing the most suitable for our car can be a headache …

Everyone knows that car engine oil is essential for the proper functioning of our vehicle. Its fundamental function is to lubricate the moving parts to reduce the wear caused by friction. In addition, and thanks to its detergent additives, it keeps the engine parts clean, preventing corrosion and, as if this were not enough, it helps to control its temperature. The million-dollar question about oil has always been: and what is the best oil for my car? Well, the answer is very simple: the one that the manufacturer has stipulated in the maintenance book of the vehicle. You can buy brake oil and lubrication oils online too.

  1. TO CHOOSE OIL, ALWAYS FOLLOW THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CAR MANUFACTURER

If you think that the oil is the true “life saver” of the engine, you will understand that the maintenance book tells you which oil to use to meet the highest quality standards according to the specifications of current international regulations. For this, a series of acronyms are used that, although most of us sound like Chinese, are easier to differentiate from what, a priori, it seems.

  1. THE OIL IS DIFFERENT FOR GASOLINE ENGINES AND DIESEL ENGINES

The American Petroleum Institute (API) is the international association that represents the more than 400 corporations involved in the production, refinement and distribution of oil. Among its many functions, it classifies the types of engine oil depending on whether the type of lubricant is for 4-stroke gasoline engines (S), 2-stroke gasoline engines (T) or for diesel engines (C). To this first letter, a second one is added that, in alphabetical order from A to Z, as the quality or technical specifications that the oil meets improve. Thus, since October 2010, the highest specification in gasoline is SN and in diesel, CJ.

  1. THE OIL VISCOSITY GRADE

Another of the specifications of the oil is the viscosity or what is the same: the time it takes a certain amount of oil to flow through a hole at a standard temperature. The longer, the higher the viscosity! The viscosity grades are specified by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers), based on whether the oil is monograde or multi-grade:

Monograde: same viscosity when the engine is cold and when the engine is very hot: 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50 and 60.

Multi-grade: A viscosity for when the engine works cold and another viscosity for when the engine is very hot. To separate the two indices – cold viscosity and hot viscosity – the letter W (“winter”) is placed between the two figures. Therefore, a 5w30 multi-grade oil indicates a viscosity degree 5 cold and 30, hot.

  1. IF THE MAINTENANCE BOOK INDICATES THAT THE CAR CAN BE USED, FOR EXAMPLE, 5W30, 5W40 AND 5W50, WHICH OIL DO WE CHOOSE?

As the mileage of the car increases, the engine parts acquire gaps, so it is advisable to increase the hot viscosity, reducing friction between parts. You also have to take into account factors such as if the vehicle “sleeps” on the street in winter. That is why it is best to be advised by specialized personnel.

  1. CONVENTIONAL OR SYNTHETIC OILS?

Depending on their manufacturing, oils are also classified as conventional (minerals or derivatives directly from petroleum) and synthetic (manufactured in laboratories). The former are cheaper and are the ones that older cars usually use. Synthetics are more precise in their properties, less volatile and more appropriate for extreme temperatures. Click here to read more.

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